t pzdk
July 23, 2014

princess-caboose:

mrdecraprio:

excuse you

wHO DID THIS.

(via thekingwhostillcared)

July 23, 2014

(Source: cordjefferson, via tmills)

July 23, 2014
garbage men rolling through at 5:05am

garbage men rolling through at 5:05am

July 23, 2014
marinatinginmyawesomeness:

First poster for “Five Armies”
I just had a geekgasm & my endorkphins are through the roof.
I may need a candy cigarette.

marinatinginmyawesomeness:

First poster for “Five Armies”

I just had a geekgasm & my endorkphins are through the roof.

I may need a candy cigarette.

July 23, 2014

(Source: videogamebread, via nameisnull)

July 23, 2014
"

There are good reasons for any species to think darkly of its own extinction. Ninety-nine percent of the species that have lived on Earth have gone extinct, including more than five tool-using hominids. A quick glance at the fossil record could frighten you into thinking that Earth is growing more dangerous with time. If you carve the planet’s history into nine ages, each spanning five hundred million years, only in the ninth do you find mass extinctions, events that kill off more than two thirds of all species.

But this is deceptive. Earth has always had her hazards; it’s just that for us to see them, she had to fill her fossil beds with variety, so that we could detect discontinuities across time. The tree of life had to fill out before it could be pruned.

"

Ross Andersen’s paradoxically gloomy yet intellectually pleasing piece, “Humanity’s deep future.” (via climateadaptation)

Very good read.

"That’s why Bostrom hopes the Curiosity rover fails. ‘Any discovery of life that didn’t originate on Earth makes it less likely the great filter is in our past, and more likely it’s in our future,’ he told me. If life is a cosmic fluke, then we’ve already beaten the odds, and our future is undetermined — the galaxy is there for the taking. If we discover that life arises everywhere, we lose a prime suspect in our hunt for the great filter. The more advanced life we find, the worse the implications. If Curiosity spots a vertebrate fossil embedded in Martian rock, it would mean that a Cambrian explosion occurred twice in the same solar system. It would give us reason to suspect that nature is very good at knitting atoms into complex animal life, but very bad at nurturing star-hopping civilisations. It would make it less likely that humans have already slipped through the trap whose jaws keep our skies lifeless. It would be an omen."

July 22, 2014

for the seals

July 22, 2014

July 22, 2014

Leading sci-fi experts, filmmakers, science fiction writers, film critics and scientists pick the best sci-fi movies ever made

July 22, 2014

derpycats:

Hamster wheel for cats

(via danforth)

July 22, 2014
Provided beach house literature.

Provided beach house literature.

July 22, 2014
Phish’s 2014 Fall Tour Announced

July 22, 2014
I can always count on Brian

I can always count on Brian

July 22, 2014
4/4

4/4

July 22, 2014

3/4